2 items tagged "visualization"

  • Business Intelligence Trends for 2017

    businessintelligence 5829945be5abcAnalyst and consulting firm, Business Application Research Centre (BARC), has come out with the top BI trends based on a survey carried out on 2800 BI professionals. Compared to last year, there were no significant changes in the ranking of the importance of BI trends, indicating that no major market shifts or disruptions are expected to impact this sector.
     
    With the growing advancement and disruptions in IT, the eight meta trends that influence and affect the strategies, investments and operations of enterprises, worldwide, are Digitalization, Consumerization, Agility, Security, Analytics, Cloud, Mobile and Artificial Intelligence. All these meta trends are major drivers for the growing demand for data management, business intelligence and analytics (BI). Their growth would also specify the trend for this industry.The top three trends out of 21 trends for 2017 were:
    • Data discovery and visualization,
    • Self-service BI and
    • Data quality and master data management
    • Data labs and data science, cloud BI and data as a product were the least important trends for 2017.
    Data discovery and visualization, along with predictive analytics, are some of the most desired BI functions that users want in a self-service mode. But the report suggested that organizations should also have an underlying tool and data governance framework to ensure control over data.
     
    In 2016, BI was majorly used in the finance department followed by management and sales and there was a very slight variation in their usage rates in that last 3 years. But, there was a surge in BI usage in production and operations departments which grew from 20% in 2008 to 53% in 2016.
     
    "While BI has always been strong in sales and finance, production and operations departments have traditionally been more cautious about adopting it,” says Carsten Bange, CEO of BARC. “But with the general trend for using data to support decision-making, this has all changed. Technology for areas such as event processing and real-time data integration and visualization has become more widely available in recent years. Also, the wave of big data from the Internet of Things and the Industrial Internet has increased awareness and demand for analytics, and will likely continue to drive further BI usage in production and operations."
     
    Customer analysis was the #1 investment area for new BI projects with 40% respondents investing their BI budgets on customer behavior analysis and 32% on developing a unified view of customers.
    • “With areas such as accounting and finance more or less under control, companies are moving to other areas of the enterprise, in particular to gain a better understanding of customer, market and competitive dynamics,” said Carsten Bange.
    • Many BI trends in the past, have become critical BI components in the present.
    • Many organizations were also considering trends like collaboration and sensor data analysis as critical BI components. About 20% respondents were already using BI trends like collaboration and spatial/location analysis.
    • About 12% were using cloud BI and more were planning to employ it in the future. IBM's Watson and Salesforce's Einstein are gearing to meet this growth.
    • Only 10% of the respondents used social media analysis.
    • Sensor data analysis is also growing driven by the huge volumes of data generated by the millions of IoT devices being used by telecom, utilities and transportation industries. According to the survey, in 2017, the transport and telecoms industries would lead the leveraging of sensor data.
    The biggest new investments in BI are planned in the manufacturing and utilities industries in 2017.
     
    Source: readitquick.com, November 14, 2016
  • Visualization, analytics and machine learning - Are they fads, or fashions?

    Machine learningI was recently a presenter in the financial planning and analysis (FP&A) track at an analytics conference where a speaker in one of the customer marketing tracks said something that stimulated my thinking. He said, “Just because something is shiny and new or is now the ‘in’ thing, it doesn’t mean it works for everyone.”

    That got me to thinking about some of the new ideas and innovations that organizations are being exposed to and experimenting with. Are they fads and new fashions or something that will more permanently stick? Let’s discuss a few of them:

    Dashboards

    Visualization software is a new rage. Your mother said to you when you were a child, “Looks are not everything.” Well, she was wrong. Viewing table data visually, like in a bar histogram, enables people to quickly grasp information with perspective. But be cautious. Yes, it might be nice to import your table data from your spreadsheets and display them in a dashboard! Won’t that be fun? Well it may be fun, but what are the unintended consequences of reporting performance measures as a dial or barometer?

    A concern I have is that measures reported in isolation of other measures provides little to no context as to why the measure is being reported and what “drives” the measure. Ideally dashboard measures should have some cause-and-effect relationship with key performance indicators (KPIs) that should be derived from a strategy map and reported in a balanced scorecard. 

    KPIs are defined as monitoring the progress toward accomplishing the 15-25 strategic objective boxes in a strategy map defined by the executive team. The strategy map provides the context from which the dashboard performance indicators (PIs) can be tested and validated for their alignment with the executive team’s strategy.

    Business analytics

    Talk about something that is “hot.” Who has not heard the terms Big Data and business analytics? If you raised your hand, then I am honored that I am apparently the first blogger you have ever read. Business analytics is definitely a next managerial wave. I am biased towards them because my 1971 university degree was in industrial engineering and operations research. I love looking at statistics. So do television sports fans who are now provided “stats” for teams and players in football, baseball, golf and every kind of televised sport. But the peril of business analytics is they need to serve a purpose for problem solving or seeking opportunities. 

    The analytics thought leader James Taylor advises, “Work backwards with the end in mind.” That is, know why you are applying analytics. Experienced analysts typically start with a hypothesis to prove or disprove. They don’t apply analytics as if they are searching for a diamond in a coal mine. They don’t flog the data until it confesses with the truth. Instead, they first speculate that two or more things are related or that some underlying behavior is driving a pattern seen in various data.

    Machine learning and cognitive software

    There are an increasing number of articles and blogs with this theme related to artificial intelligence – the robots are coming and they will replace jobs. Here is my take. Many executives, managers, and organizations underestimate how soon they will be affected and the severity of the impact. This means that many organizations are unprepared for the effects of digital disruption and may pay the price through lower competitive performance and lost business. Thus it is important to recognize not only the speed of digital disruption, but also the opportunities and risks that it brings, so that the organization can adjust and re-skill its employees to add value.

    Organizations that embrace a “digital disruptor” way of thinking will gain a competitive edge. Digitization will create new products and services for new markets providing potentially substantial returns for investors in these new business models. Organizations must either “disrupt” or “be disrupted”. Companies often fail to recognize disruptive threats until it is too late. And even if they do, they fail to act boldly and quickly enough. Embracing “digital transformation” is their recourse for protection.

    Fads or fashions?

    Are these fads and fashions or the real deal? Are managers attracted to them as the shiny new toys that they must have on their resume for their next bigger job and employer? My belief is these three “hot” managerial methods and tools are essential. But they need to be thought through and properly designed and customized; and not just slapped in willy-nilly just to have them as shiny new toys.

    Bron: Gary Cokins (Information Management)


     
     

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