2 items tagged "customer experience"

  • 10 Big Data Trends for 2017

    big-dataInfogix, a leader in helping companies provide end-to-end data analysis across the enterprise, today highlighted the top 10 data trends they foresee will be strategic for most organizations in 2017.
     
    “This year’s trends examine the evolving ways enterprises can realize better business value with big data and how improving business intelligence can help transform organization processes and the customer experience (CX),” said Sumit Nijhawan, CEO and President of Infogix. “Business executives are demanding better data management for compliance and increased confidence to steer the business, more rapid adoption of big data and innovative and transformative data analytic technologies.”
     
    The top 10 data trends for 2017 are assembled by a panel of Infogix senior executives. The key trends include:
     
    1.    The Proliferation of Big Data
        Proliferation of big data has made it crucial to analyze data quickly to gain valuable insight.
        Organizations must turn the terabytes of big data that is not being used, classified as dark data, into useable data.   
        Big data has not yet yielded the substantial results that organizations require to develop new insights for new, innovative offerings to derive a competitive advantage
     
    2.    The Use of Big Data to Improve CX
        Using big data to improve CX by moving from legacy to vendor systems, during M&A, and with core system upgrades.
        Analyzing data with self-service flexibility to quickly harness insights about leading trends, along with competitive insight into new customer acquisition growth opportunities.
        Using big data to better understand customers in order to improve top line revenue through cross-sell/upsell or remove risk of lost revenue by reducing churn.
     
    3.    Wider Adoption of Hadoop
        More and more organizations will be adopting Hadoop and other big data stores, in turn, vendors will rapidly introduce new, innovative Hadoop solutions.
        With Hadoop in place, organizations will be able to crunch large amounts of data using advanced analytics to find nuggets of valuable information for making profitable decisions.
     
    4.    Hello to Predictive Analytics
        Precisely predict future behaviors and events to improve profitability.
        Make a leap in improving fraud detection rapidly to minimize revenue risk exposure and improve operational excellence.
     
    5.    More Focus on Cloud-Based Data Analytics
        Moving data analytics to the cloud accelerates adoption of the latest capabilities to turn data into action.
        Cut costs in ongoing maintenance and operations by moving data analytics to the cloud.
     
    6.    The Move toward Informatics and the Ability to Identify the Value of Data
        Use informatics to help integrate the collection, analysis and visualization of complex data to derive revenue and efficiency value from that data
        Tap an underused resource – data – to increase business performance
     
    7.    Achieving Maximum Business Intelligence with Data Virtualization
        Data virtualization unlocks what is hidden within large data sets.
        Graphic data virtualization allows organizations to retrieve and manipulate data on the fly regardless of how the data is formatted or where it is located.
     
    8.    Convergence of IoT, the Cloud, Big Data, and Cybersecurity
        The convergence of data management technologies such as data quality, data preparation, data analytics, data integration and more.
        As we continue to become more reliant on smart devices, inter-connectivity and machine learning will become even more important to protect these assets from cyber security threats.
     
    9.    Improving Digital Channel Optimization and the Omnichannel Experience
        Delivering the balance of traditional channels with digital channels to connect with the customer in their preferred channel.
        Continuously looking for innovative ways to enhance CX across channels to achieve a competitive advantage.
     
    10.    Self-Service Data Preparation and Analytics to Improve Efficiency
        Self-service data preparation tools boost time to value enabling organizations to prepare data regardless of the type of data, whether structured, semi-structured or unstructured.
        Decreased reliance on development teams to massage the data by introducing more self-service capabilities to give power to the user and, in turn, improve operational efficiency.
     
    “Every year we see more data being generated than ever before and organizations across all industries struggle with its trustworthiness and quality. We believe the technology trends of cloud, predictive analysis and big data will not only help organizations deal with the vast amount of data, but help enterprises address today’s business challenges,” said Nijhawan. “However, before these trends lead to the next wave of business, it’s critical that organizations understand that the success is predicated upon data integrity.”
     
    Source: dzone.com, November 20, 2016
  • Information Is Now The Core Of Your Business

    DataData is at the very core of the business models of the future – and this means wrenching change for some organizations.

    We tend to think of our information systems as a foundation layer that support the “real” business of the organization – for example, by providing the information executives need to steer the business and make the right decisions.

    But information is rapidly becoming much more than that: it’s turning into an essential component of the products and services we sell.

    Information-augmented products

    In an age of social media transparency, products “speak for themselves”– if you have a great product, your customers will tell their friends. If you have a terrible product, they’ll tell the world. Your marketing and sales teams have less room for maneuver, because prospects can easily ask existing customers if your product lives up to the promises.

    And customer expectations have risen. We all now expect to be treated as VIPs, with a “luxury” experience. When we make a purchase, we expect to be recognized. We expect our suppliers to know what we’ve bought in the past. And we expect personalized product recommendations, based on our profile, the purchases of other people like us, and the overall context of what’s happening right now.

    This type of customer experience doesn’t just require information systems; the information is an element of the experience itself, part of what we’re purchasing, and what differentiates products and services in the market.

    New ways of selling

    New technologies like 3D printing and the internet of things are allowing companies to rethink existing products.

    Products can be more easily customized and personalized for every customer. Pricing can be more variable to address new customer niches. And products can be turned into services, with customers paying on a per-usage basis.

    Again, information isn’t just supporting the manufacturing and sale of the product – it’s part of what makes it a “product” in the first place.

    Information as a product

    In many industries, the information collected by business is now more valuable than the products being sold – indeed, it’s the foundation for most of the free consumer internet. Traditional industries are now realizing that the data stored in their systems, once suitably augmented or anonymized, can be sold directly. See this article on the Digitalist magazine, The Hidden Treasure Inside Your Business, for more information about the four main information business models.

    A culture change for “traditional IT”

    Traditional IT systems were about efficiency, effectiveness, and integrity. These new context-based experiences and more sophisticated products use information to generate growth, innovation, and market differentiation. But these changes lead to a difficult cultural challenge inside the organization.

    Today’s customer-facing business and product teams don’t just need reliable information infrastructures. They need to be able to experiment, using information to test new product options and ways of selling. This requires not only much more flexibility and agility than in the past, but also new ways of working, new forms of IT organization, and new sharing of responsibilities.

    The majority of today’s CIOs grew up in an era of “IT industrialization,” with the implementation of company-wide ERP systems. But what made them successful in the past won’t necessarily help them win in the new digital era.

    Gartner believes that the role of the “CIO” has already split into two distinct functions: Chief Infrastructure Officers whose job is to “keep the lights on”; and Chief Innovation Offers, who collaborate closely with the business to build the business models of the future.

    IT has to help lead

    Today’s business leaders know that digital is the future, but typically only have a hazy idea of the possibilities. They know technology is important, but often don’t have a concrete plan for moving forward: 90% of CEOs believe the digital economy will have a major impact on their industry. But only 25% have a plan in place, and less than 15% are funding and executing a digital transformation plan.

    Business people want help from IT to explain what’s possible. Today, only 7% of executives say that IT leads their organization’s attempts to identify opportunities to innovate, 35% believe that it should. After decades of complaints from CIOs that businesses aren’t being strategic enough about technology, this is a fantastic new opportunity.

    Design Thinking and prototyping

    Today’s CIOs have to step up to digital innovation. The problem is that it can be very hard to understand — history is packed with examples of business leaders that just didn’t “get” the new big thing.  Instead of vague notions of “disruption,” IT can help by explaining to business people how to add information into a company’s future product experiences.

    The best way to do this is through methodologies such as Design Thinking, and agile prototyping using technologies should as Build.me, a cloud platform that allows pioneers to create and test the viability of new applications with staff and customers long before any actual coding.

    Conclusion

    The bottom line is that digital innovation is less about the technology, and more about the transformation — but IT has an essential role to play in demonstrating what’s possible, and needs to step up to new leadership roles.

     

    Source: timoelliot.com, November 14, 2016

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